How You Can Get Banned on Twitch as a Streamer

Streamer gaming and chatting with viewers on a dual-monitor PC.
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Streaming on Twitch is a great way to connect with your fans and build a following, but you must follow the rules of the platform. Failing to do so could result in a permanent loss of your streaming and Twitch privileges.

What Happens If You’re Banned?

Getting banned from Twitch as a content creator can be a crushing blow. Not being able to stream could be a big loss of income. It might also leave your viewers wondering what happened. If you’re fortunate to have a strong fanbase, you can use other social media networks to let your followers know about the situation and what you plan on doing next.

One of the major downsides of getting banned is that Twitch doesn’t have to disclose the reason. They can simply state that you violated their terms of service, and then leave it at that. This can be incredibly frustrating since you might not know what you did wrong. You can apply for a ban appeal, but there’s no guarantee that it will be successful.

Twitch can issue a temporary ban, which usually lasts between one and 30 days. They may also issue a permanent ban, which means you’ll never be allowed to stream on the platform again. They can disable your account, preventing you from accessing most of the platform’s features, including watching other streamers, messaging in the chat, and showing yourself on someone else’s live stream.

The last one is important to remember because you could potentially get somebody else banned for appearing on their stream. As harsh as it sounds, you’re completely banished everywhere on Twitch until you’re no longer banned. Bans are also IP-based, so there’s no point in making a new account.

Inappropriate Content

One of the most common reasons streamers get banned on Twitch is for broadcasting inappropriate content. This includes nudity, sexual acts, violence, weapons, and illegal substances and acts. Not only can you not broadcast these things, but you also can’t promote them in any way.

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This means that you can’t talk about illegal drugs, even if you’re not using them, because it can be seen as promoting them. Discussing or showcasing acts of violence and threats is also prohibited, and this includes physical and non-physical violence. You cannot harass, bully, or deliver any form of hate speech.

Basically, if you’re doing or showcasing something that’s obviously offensive, disturbing, or inappropriate, you’re likely going to get banned. To play it safe, treat your audience as if they were kids. If there’s anything you wouldn’t want a kid to see to hear about, you shouldn’t show it or say it on stream either.

RELATED: Why YouTube Videos “Made for Kids” Have Restricted Features

Copyright Infringement

Regarding copyright infringement, you must follow Twitch’s Digital Millennium Copyright Act Notification Guidelines and Music Guidelines. They’ll give you a maximum of three strikes before they permanently ban you from the platform. This includes playing unlicensed music, using someone else’s artwork, or broadcasting a movie or TV show without the proper permission.

Even though you’re not allowed to play unlicensed content or music, you likely won’t get banned for it right away. Twitch may issue your first strike and then mute copyrighted audio or take down your video on demand (VOD), which is a recording of your live stream. If they see that you’re repeatedly infringing on someone else’s copyright, they’ll issue a second and then third strike.

Your only way around this is to play original music or anything that’s licensed to you. You can also use Soundtrack by Twitch, which is a curated music library that you can use while streaming. Regarding content, don’t show anything that you don’t own or have the right to broadcast.

Illegal Activity

You may also get banned on Twitch if you’re engaging in any illegal activity, such as hacking, cheating in a video game, or distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. This also includes promoting or linking to websites that engage in these activities.

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Even though it may seem fun to download cheat software and stream yourself beating other players with it, that behavior is not permissible. And of course, the more obvious illegal activities, such as using illicit drugs will immediately get you the ban hammer.

Selling Twitch Features

Twitch has a wide variety of features you can use to engage with your viewers. However, you’re not allowed to sell any of them. This includes things like selling your chat moderation services. Many people love moderating chat because it gives them a higher status and more privileges in the community. So, if you’re trying to profit off of that, you’ll get banned.

Avoid shady tactics such as paying or accepting money to raid other channels, host someone, or gift subscriptions. Interactions and exchanges like these are supposed to happen naturally. You might get away with it for a while, but it only takes one mistake for you to get banned. You’re also relying on the other party to not get caught, which is out of your control.

Saying Bannable Words

Believe it or not, saying certain words on Twitch can also get you banned from the platform. This is outside of the obvious racial and homophobic slurs, hate speech, and other profanity. You are allowed to curse, but you can’t use words that are deemed too offensive because of their negative connotations.

One of these outside words you might not be familiar with is “simp.” It’s often used to describe someone who gives all of their attention and care to another person who usually doesn’t reciprocate. It’s considered a derogatory term in the Twitch community, so you can’t say or type it.

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It may sound silly if you’re new to the platform, but it’s important to be aware of the words you can’t use. The community is constantly changing, and new words are added to the list all the time. To be safe, study the words you’re not allowed to say and avoid any words that could be considered overly offensive. Respect everyone’s religion, political beliefs, background, gender orientation, and sexual preferences.